This study skills course is a continuation of College Success. I have additional study strategies critical for academic success.  Students will learn to increase their study skills in memorization, listening, and test taking.  In addition, students will develop a better understanding of the culture of college by learning how to interact with professors and peers in a post-secondary setting.

This course assists students in understanding their own disability, and how it impacts learning, employment and social interactions. Personal strengths and challenges when learning new and/or difficult information in school and on the job are identified. Students will become familiar with the transition process as it relates to their IEP; their current life status in each of the transition areas; basic laws and disability rights in secondary education, post-secondary education, and employment; and how to identify and ask for accommodations in various environments. Self-Advocacy skill development, and understanding community agencies and how to access those resources are key components of this class.

This course provides academic writing skills required in the post-secondary setting.  Course content may include the writing process, editing and grammar skills, and writing paragraphs, essays, and research papers.

This daily discussion group provides a forum for peers to discuss life experiences and personal challenges, while employing a problem-solving process and developing effective self-expression skills. The students through a daily “check-in” raise discussion topics. Effective communication mechanics is encouraged, as is a positive and affirming group atmosphere. Respect for interpersonal boundaries is required, as is active listening and rounded participation. 

This class is an independent living simulation “real life” which takes the independent living skills learned previously in prerequisite course material and put them into action.  Students are assigned a roommate and learn the advantages and disadvantages.  Curriculum covered during the this course include: apartment/independent living application processes, damage deposits, move in check list, signing a lease, ending a lease early and cost involved with moving.  Student’s grocery shop and prepare meal plans from a prerequisite class working within a daily budget.  Students demonstrate the skills needed and complete basic housekeeping and maintenance skills that are completed daily, weekly, monthly and yearly.  Students also learn how to respond to emergency situations.

(Prerequisite to Practicum for Independent Living  -South)  This course focuses on five areas: Rental costs, leases, defining terms, furnishing an apartment, and living with a roommate.  Students will have a better understanding of factors that are important in locating an apartment or independent living arrangement, reading ads and abbreviations, accessing information via the internet, and determining monthly expenses.  Students will have a greater understanding of periodic vs. fixed term leases, understanding leases, and tenant rights.  Students will learn about security deposits, application fees, rent credits, renters insurance and utility bills.  Students will also learn about items needed to furnish and stock apartment, and compare the costs of new vs. used.  Students will increase their awareness of living with a roommate, expectations, compatibility and resources to find roommates.

This class is an independent living simulation “real life” which takes the independent living skills learned previously in prerequisite course material and put them into action.  Students are assigned a roommate and learn the advantages and disadvantages.  Curriculum covered during the this course include: apartment/independent living application processes, damage deposits, move in check list, signing a lease, ending a lease early and cost involved with moving.  Student’s grocery shop and prepare meal plans from a prerequisite class working within a daily budget.  Students demonstrate the skills needed and complete basic housekeeping and maintenance skills that are completed daily, weekly, monthly and yearly.  Students also learn how to respond to emergency situations.

This course assists students in understanding their own disability, and how it impacts learning, employment and social interactions. Personal strengths and challenges when learning new and/or difficult information in school and on the job are identified. Students will become familiar with the transition process as it relates to their IEP; their current life status in each of the transition areas; basic laws and disability rights in secondary education, post-secondary education, and employment; and how to identify and ask for accommodations in various environments. Self-Advocacy skill development, and understanding community agencies and how to access those resources are key components of this class.

(Prerequisite to Practicum for Independent Living)  Students gain understanding of mypyramid, serving sizes, six essential nutrients, reading food labels, food diaries, and disease prevention.  From this information students develop 6 meals; breakfast (2), lunch (2), and dinner (2) with and without recipes.  Students then analyze cost of the meals ensuring that they are within a $45 budget.

This class is designed to introduce the student to basic office skills.  Each student will work on increasing keyboarding skills, informal and formal correspondence, electronic filing using Microsoft Excel, data entry, office documents using Microsoft Word, and ordering supplies online.  

Students will increase their awareness of mental health issues.  Topics include identifying chemical use and abuse as well as understanding the effects.  Students will also have a better understanding of how the use of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and caffeine can greatly affect a person’s health.   Students will learn how to identify signs of depression, suicide, mental illness and gambling additions.  Interventions, coping strategies and resources available are introduced and discussed.

This class is an independent living simulation “real life” which takes the independent living skills learned previously in prerequisite course material and put them into action.  Students are assigned a roommate and learn the advantages and disadvantages.  Curriculum covered during the this course include: apartment/independent living application processes, damage deposits, move in check list, signing a lease, ending a lease early and cost involved with moving.  Student’s grocery shop and prepare meal plans from a prerequisite class working within a daily budget.  Students demonstrate the skills needed and complete basic housekeeping and maintenance skills that are completed daily, weekly, monthly and yearly.  Students also learn how to respond to emergency situations.

Students are provided the opportunity to increase literacy through reading, movies, and/or books on tape.  Focus is on reading for pleasure while attending to comprehension, making predictions, understanding story plot, character analysis, and vocabulary expansion.  Students will read novels and increase reading comprehension, organize ideas in a logical order, write a rough draft, and edit/revise independently.

Recreation and leisure develops confidence in broadening social skills in a  nd out of class, going from current comfort levels to being open to new experiences. Students will identify preferred activities, determine how to access activities, plan when and where the activity is to take place, confirm or cancel plans and follow through in participating in the activity at school and in the community.

Advanced:

This class reviews many of the topics from the Basic Family Life class: awareness of positive relationships, our bodies, public and private places and behavior, appropriate touch and safety with strangers as well as people we know. The Advanced class covers more topics, which include human reproduction, sexual decision making, birth control and sexually transmitted infections.

PowerPoint shows,  Boardmaker social stories, videos, and discussions are used throughout this class.

Check activities for appropriateness for your students - some videos are for more mature and possibly sexually active students (STRIVE, INVEST, FOCUS, EXPLORE and some PHASE students).

Parental/guardian permission is required and pre- and post testing is done to check for understanding.

This book is from the Magic Tree House Series (#26) by Mary Pope Osborne. Students will read* this book over 7 to 9 weeks, answer comprehension questions, be exposed to new vocabulary and participate in a variety of activities related to the theme.

* some actually read, some listen to book being read, or help operate ALD switch.

 

This book is from the Magic Tree House Series (#9) by Mary Pope Osborne. Students will read* this book over 7 to 9 weeks, answer comprehension questions, be exposed to new vocabulary and participate in a variety of activities related to the theme.

* some actually read, some listen to book being read, or help operate ALD switch.

 

This class covers a variety of topics that promote awareness of positive relationships, our bodies, public and private places and behavior, appropriate touch and safety with strangers as well as people we know. PowerPoint shows,  Boardmaker social stories, videos, and discussions are used throughout this class.

Parental/guardian permission is required and pre- and post testing is done to check for understanding.

Here many of the skills needed to achieve an independent level of preparing meals and snacks, are addressed.  Students plan cooking projects, shop for the necessary ingredients and then prepare and consume the food.  This class also works on raising student awareness of healthy lifestyles as well as choices that we make when planning and preparing a meal or snack.

This class provides an opportunity for students to learn about current events.  Utilizing a newspaper published weekly especially for students with special needs, this class incorporates reading fluency, comprehension, geography, and social studies.  The News-2-You also offers recipes, and puzzles.  Students also learn about other news sources and learn how to use them.

 

This is a course that helps student organize important information.

 The PCI Reading Program builds student success one level at a time. Completion of the three levels will take a non-reader to approximately a 3.0-3.5 reading level. Level three moves students toward reading independence by teaching basic decoding using 23 onsets and 20 word families selected from words taught in levels one and two. Students learn the basics of word analysis, word building, and decoding. Build upon the successful controlled-vocabulary approach from level one and two, students transition to learning onsets in the Letter/Sound Correspondence Lessons and word families in the Core Instruction Guide. Level Three also expands students’ reading selections, adding the genres of poetry and nonfiction. In Level Three, students mature as both readers and writers, learning and applying comprehension skills and strategies as well as practicing fluency and writing. Comprehension skills, including: setting, main idea, cause and effect, main character, character traits, supporting details, compare and contrast, using graphic sources, fact and opinion, identifying fiction and nonfiction, sequencing events, conflict and resolution, and identifying how to steps and the outcomes. Unit tests include both word decoding and comprehension questions. Students learn and practice the fluency skills of accuracy, rate, smoothness, phrasing, and expression. Students also write to communicate word comprehension and to respond to a book that has been read.

Students explore a variety of countries and cultures through music, movement, folktales, peparing and tasting traditional food, examining artifacts, reading, viewing, paperwork, map, and art activities.

The interactive lessons teach beginning readers to automatically recognize an additional 140 sight words and common nouns and verbs through visual discrimination and the use of a comprehensive system of repetion, high-intterest activities, and controlled vocabulary reading.  While level two's focus is still on teaching word through visual discrimination, it also introduces students to several new reading skills.

The Edmark Reading Program, Level 2, is an extensiion of Level 1 fror students who have successfully completed Level 1.  Level 2 Continues to provide students with one-to-one teacher to student lessons.  Level 2 teaches 200 words including compound words, as well as reviewing and reinforcing words learned in Level 1.

Students work on meeting their fitness goals at the YMCA.

The Edmark Reading Program offers lessons in Pre-Reading, Word Recognition, Direction Cards, Picture/Phrase Cards, Storoes, Reviews, and tests.  The Edmark Reading Program, Level 1 teaches students 150 basic sight words plus endings (-s, -ed, -ing), taking a non-reader to possible 1.0 reading level.

THis will compile all of our teaching materials for our literacy curriculum in the STIP program.

PCI Environmental Print Series Level one integrates forms of environmental print such as road signs and indoor signs into the story lines of books about adolescent characters.  It teaches 48 signs, first through the context of a book and then generalized through a poster of a community scene.  Each unit’s book and poster focus on three signs in one of four environments: Streets and Roads, Restaurants, Work Places, and community Places.

This class focuses on developing communication skills necessary for students to have meaningful conversations with the people around them.  Some skills that are included are: Introducing yourself, asking questions, reading non-verbal cues, conversational etiquette, and staying on topic.

I need a copy of this course.

a grown-up version of morning meeting